Pitching Under Docks

Discussion in 'Rods - Reels - Tackles - Electronics' started by pfhunter, Aug 15, 2016.

  1. pfhunter

    pfhunter Member

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    I know it takes practice but are there any particular rod and reels that help with this I am currently using Shamano Curado and Falcon 6'6" med. hvy. rod get a lot of backlashes any suggestions and tips will greatly be appreciated
     
  2. Dave Todd

    Dave Todd Member

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    I grew up on dockless lakes in AZ. A friend of mine who I fish with here uses spinning gear and is deadly with it.
     
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  3. Chris Baker

    Chris Baker Well-Known Member

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    That's the same setup I use. I would start with your spool tension fairly tight. You can loosen as you get better. I mostly "skip" my bait with a side cast and chunk it pretty hard. So hard that I destroy jigs at times. Just keep at it.
     
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  4. Chris Baker

    Chris Baker Well-Known Member

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    For true pitching though you'll need a little longer rod with a soft tip.
     
  5. AndrewO

    AndrewO Well-Known Member

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    For pitching yes, use a longer rod.

    For skipping, use a medium heavy rod, but use one that has some bend in it (more parabolic action). You want a rod that will load up and slingshot that bait out there. If I know I am going to be skipping a bunch of docks, I use an old weightless worm special that I accidentally snapped the top inch or so off of. It is short and has that give I am talking about, but also still has some power for moving fish. I can keep the rod low and skip a bait more easily with a shorter rod. I am a pretty terrible skipper and it usually takes me a good little while to get my groove going. If you really want to ping the bulkheads at the back of a dock and aren't the second coming of Bryan Thrift, use a spinning rod with some braid. Just my .02
     
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  6. Strictly Biznuss

    Strictly Biznuss Well-Known Member

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    Any good quality reel will make it at least somewhat easier for ya. Basically most any reel that has at least a $100 price tag. It can be done effectively with pretty much any reel though. As you said, practice makes perfect ... or at least near perfect... even KVD backlashes every now and then. No substitute for practice. Get it down with the spinning rod before you really dive into doing it with a baitcaster. The main thing is patience. The biggest problem I see when I try to teach clients how to do it on occasion is that they are not nearly patient enough with themselves. Know that it is going to take time, you are going to mess up, get backlashes, hook docks and trees... it's gonna be a mess for a while. No biggie. And when it comes to doing it with a baitcaster, it's highly unlikely that you are going to get it down in one fishing trip or even several fishing trips. Patience is key. It will come.
     
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  7. DBarron

    DBarron Well-Known Member

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    Personally I prefer a shorter rod for skipping, something in the 6'6"-6"9" variety, and with a soft tip as fore mentioned. I'm not a tall guy so longer rods make it more difficult for me to roll cast under docks. My technique is slightly unconventional but I do this funky under hand roll cast and when I finish my swing the bait leaves the rod tip just inches above the water. As you progress you will find it easier to skip with a loose reel rather than a tight casting control because it requires less effort and allows you to better control the cast.
    Something else to consider is the type of bait your'e skipping. There needs to be a balance of weight to bulk of the bait in order to achieve a good cast. If a jig is too heavy try a bulky trailer to add mass to the bait. Small dense or heavy baits don't cast well, think of skipping rocks.
     
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  8. AndrewO

    AndrewO Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, if you are starting out a 1/4 oz. arkie head jig with a beaver style trailer is a good bait to learn to skip with and you will probably get bit on it too.
     
  9. John T Mc

    John T Mc Well-Known Member

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    agree with the guys above about the shorter rod. I will skip soft plastics with my Stradic spinning setup with light braid and a short flouro leader but for me it's the rod and I don't even use a fancy one. I'ts a lower end Shimano something or other.... 6'6".

    Jigs... I get the Curado out and it's a very different process for me though. w/ the spinning setup and I load up and sling the shit out of it with no worries but with the baitcaster, it's a much more careful and gentle skip.

    at the end of the day, 90% of the time, I'm using my spinning set up.

    oh yeah... and lots of practice... :)
     
  10. Russ Truitt

    Russ Truitt New Member

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    It helps me to only put about 40' of line on my reel, length of the docks your skipping, plus distance the boat is from the docks, plus a few wraps on the spool. Its less likely to backlash and if it does its easier to get out quickly. Make sure you tie a good knot on spool for obvious reasons....
     
  11. John D. Ward

    John D. Ward Moderator

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    If you have a Shimano Metanium or a Shimano Aldebaran reel you really don't have to do much. Just kind of flip your arms around in a silly motion and your bait magically skips gently 12 times all the way to the backs of dock walls. Works for me!
     
  12. AndrewO

    AndrewO Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like I need to do a reel switcheroo and get those Metaniums off my NRX dragging rods and get them on some of my other rods...
     
  13. Toadchaser

    Toadchaser Well-Known Member

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    curado not especially good for this application. I know it sounds weird, but you don't want that much line on the spool when skipping. As for tension, the line should not create more than 2 loops when you allow the bait to drop vertically down onto the water. I use a 6'6 veritas MH and 17 lb flouro with a lews 7:1 reel.
     
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  14. Toadchaser

    Toadchaser Well-Known Member

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    There are some good videos on youtube. Psychomonkey has the best in my opinion.
     
  15. Brandon Feltner

    Brandon Feltner Well-Known Member

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    Try pulling or casting out the appropriate amount of line then put tape over the remaining line on the spool. Reels always cast better with full spools. I like that tape with the lines of thread in it. You know, the kind they tape some boxes with that forces you to tear the box all to pieces trying to open it. It is very sticky. Once you kink, chafe and knot that 40ft of line, cut it off and go again.
     
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  16. goodner171

    goodner171 Well-Known Member

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    Not just rod and reel but boat position is key. I can get to the back of docks but I have to be at least 30' back to get a good cast under the target. Also +1 on spinning gear for skipping. I can use a bait caster but much easier for me with spinning gear. That way you can chunk it hard without worrying about backlash.
     
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  17. Toadchaser

    Toadchaser Well-Known Member

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    I like spinning for weightless lighter stuff but you can't beat a bait caster tuned right for jigs and creatures
     
  18. Trey

    Trey Well-Known Member

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    Spool startup inertia has a lot to do with it. Why John is experiencing easier skipping/ pitching with his Aldebaran's and Metanium's is that they have lighter, smaller diameter, low inertia spools.

    You know the bubba test where you spin the handle and then hit the thumb bar to see how long the reel will free spool? Well a heavier spool will free spool longer than a lighter one. Actually the free spool on an Aldebaran isn't that long, because it has a super light spool.

    A better option for skipping/ pitching docks than your current Curado 200, but in the same price category, is the 2016 Curado 70. It is a skipping machine built specifically for short distance applications and also throwing lightweight baits, so it has a nice low inertia spool. The improved SVS Infinity braking system also gives you a wider range of brake adjustment to fine tune your approach.

    To Todd's point, a lower line capacity reel with a smaller diameter is better suited for short distance applications with lighter weight baits (1/4-1/2 oz). Where a 200 size Curado is best for full cast applications and flipping or pitching heavier baits to cover, a Curado 70 or an Aldebaran would excel in this situation. I view the Casitas, Metanium MGL and CHCI4+ with their 150 size spools as good "all arounders"
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016
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